BOOK REVIEW: Stories for Nighttime and Some for the Day, by Ben Loory

RELEASE DATE: July 26, 2011
AUTHOR LINKS: WEB / TWITTER / GOODREADS / FACEBOOKS
PUBLISHER:
Penguin
FORMAT: Paperback
SOURCE: Library
LINKS: Amazon

Loory’s collection of wry and witty, dark and perilous contemporary fables is populated by people–and monsters and trees and jocular octopi–who are united by twin motivations: fear and desire. In his singular universe, televisions talk (and sometimes sing), animals live in small apartments where their nephews visit from the sea, and men and women and boys and girls fall down wells and fly through space and find love on Ferris wheels. In a voice full of fable, myth, and dream, Stories for Nighttime and Some for the Day draws us into a world of delightfully wicked recognitions, and introduces us to a writer of uncommon talent and imagination.

MY REVIEW

I had Ben Loory’s Stories for Nighttime and Some For the Day on my wishlist at the library for quite some time before I got it. Once I had it in my hands, I didn’t know what to think–I knew it was short stories, but for kids? For adults? With titles like ‘The Octopus’ or ‘The Fish in the Teapot,’ I thought maybe it was a scarier book of short stories for children. Either way, I was happy to give it a read–I had heard only good things about it.

I started reading it late in the evening, just before bed. It’s a surprisingly quick read and only took a few hours. From what I read about Loory, the book was written after he had taken a course on writing short horror stories. While some of the stories in the book aren’t necessarily horror, a lot of them are definitely fantasy or magical. The ones that are horror really made me think, “Yes, this is not a kid’s book!”

Think back to when you were a kid and you could just make up stories about silly things, you know–things that just don’t seem to go together, like an octopus living in the city, or the sea wanting to visit a house, or flying away like a balloon. This is what’s going on in Ben Loory’s head and it’s magical. I found all of the stories fascinating and would really recommend it to any writer who may be over-thinking their craft.

The stories are very short, lots of little paragraphs, easy dialogue, but they’re definitely stories for an escape–in fact, none of them are what one would call “normal.” But that’s not a bad thing! It felt so nice to just escape into something completely different, something that I had never read before. Horror doesn’t have to be epic 500-page novels–Ben Loory shows that horror can encompass a mere 3 pages. And he succeeds in every single story in this book.

Many of the stories in this small volume read like a little nightmare, a dark tale to chill you–just enough–on even the warmest day, while others are the epitome of charm and wit. This would be the perfect little book for a short story university class, giving each student their own little gem to dissect. I feel like I should reread the entire thing just to be sure I didn’t miss anything!

Read More Reviews of This Book

Asheley’s review –> Into The Hall of Books
Ellie’s review –> Curiosity Killed the Bookworm
Graeme’s review –> Graeme’s Fantasy Book Review

© 2012, Reading In Winter. All rights reserved.

About these ads

One thought on “BOOK REVIEW: Stories for Nighttime and Some for the Day, by Ben Loory

  1. It’s not often I buy a collection of short stories, but your review makes me want to get Stories for Nighttime and Some for the Day. Really. I’m definitely interested in the odd and quirky, and this book seems like the type. If it’s an easy read, all the better! Thanks for the review! (:

My home is where my books are. - Ellen Thompson

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s