Mini Reviews – Part 2 (The One With ALL the Horror Short Story Read-a-Thon Stories)

Short Story Read-A-Thon

The last review post had the first 6 horror short stories I read last week and this one will have the rest! Can I just say it was an awesome week of lots of great horror writing? Love that I managed to work this into my week, along with some great audiobooks and horror novels! I hope I can do the same next year and maybe read the stories I missed this year!

When The Darkness Presses and The Hole the Fox Did Make by Emily Carroll

I just found out about Canadian graphic artist and writer Emily Carroll earlier last week and I am SO in love with her! I’m also very intrigued by the whole web comic format! She had posted on Twitter about When The Darkness Presses being finished, so I thought I’d check it out. I think some of it went over my head, but I’m eager to go back and explore it again. I think one of my favourite parts of the whole story is the layout of it. It’s just so beautiful and unique … not to mention, you feel that creepy vibe almost instantly!

The Hole the Fox Did Make is also gorgeous and creepy … both stories are those that left me wanting more in the end, or at least wanting to go back and explore more and really dig at the themes of the stories. There are TONS of comics on Emily’s website — definitely worth checking out!

What’s In My Sandwich? by R. L. Stine

When I was on Twitter last week, CBC Books tweeted out a link to a new R. L. Stine Halloween short story. Since I had just been listening to some good ol’ Goosebumps by the author, I added it to my list! I didn’t realize that it was a story he tweeted out. Super short, this story packed a punch! And it made me very thankful that I had different lunch plans.

The Signalman by Charles Dickens

Talk about your effective horror! I’ve actually never read anything by Dickens (though I am a ways through A Tale of Two Cities), so I didn’t know what to expect. This story had such a creepy vibe throughout, and an ending that sent shivers up my spine. I love how it really unnerved me while reading. I knew something was up and there was a little bit of tension and then BAM! By the end, I was terrified! I definitely want to read more Dickens now.

AND I didn’t realize until I finished and looked up some reviews that this is the Doctor’s favourite Dickens. Convenient that I picked this one to read!

The Veldt by Ray Bradbury

I had heard somewhere along the way that Ray Bradbury is the master of horror. I expected a LOT from this story. In a way, this story wasn’t terrifying at all. It was another one of those stories with a subtle horror throughout, something you just couldn’t put your finger on. It’s funny because this is an older story and it kind of predicts what kind of conveniences we have in the future — some of them are absolutely bizarre, but it’s interesting how there was a truth in how much the people in the story relied on those conveniences, much like we rely on ours, even if they’re not quite the same. Another story, just like the Dickens, that had me a little on edge by the end, this one was completely different from what I expected, but still an intriguing little read.

The Tell-Tale Heart by Edgar Allen Poe

Maybe I’m not a total Edgar Allen Poe fan. I always expect something terrifying from him, but usually end up not being scared by the end. This one is pretty much what I expected, but I did find the story interesting, the descent into madness the main character experiences. It would almost do better to have this story as more of a full length story than such a short story. I think it would’ve been more effective and set a better mood that way.

The Lottery by Shirley Jackson

It had been a LONG time since I read this one, but every now and again I whip it out for a reread. This story is terrifying! It’s amazing how much joy Jackson conveys in the first pages of this story, how the reader thinks that it’s such a wonderful thing to have the lottery, only to find that it’s actually quite horrific. And the horror doesn’t really come until the last paragraphs. Why is the woman so upset? Only reading until the very end will tell you why … seriously scary story.

Have you read any of these stories? What did you think? 

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BOOK REVIEW: The Lottery And Other Stories, by Shirley Jackson

Released: February 22, 2005 (Farrar, Straus and Giroux)
Author Links: GOODREADS
Source: Purchased
Buy Now From: Amazon

The Lottery, one of the most terrifying stories written in this century, created a sensation when it was first published in The New Yorker. “Power and haunting,” and “nights of unrest” were typical reader responses. This collection, the only one to appear during Shirley Jackson’s lifetime, unites “The Lottery:” with twenty-four equally unusual stories. Together they demonstrate Jack son’s remarkable range–from the hilarious to the truly horrible–and power as a storyteller.

My Thoughts

Shirley Jackson, I’m trying to like you–I really am. The only story I remember reading previous to The Haunting of Hill House, or to this particular collection of short stories, is the title story from this book, The Lottery. I read it for a short story class in university and was disgusted when I reached the end of the story; something that started off sounding so innocent and happy, ultimately ending in the stoning of someone.

Not what I expected. Continue reading

BOOK REVIEW: The Haunting of Hill House, by Shirley Jackson

Released: November 28, 2006 (Penguin Classics)
Author Links: GOODREADS / FACEBOOK
Source: Purchased
Buy Now From: Amazon

The classic supernatural thriller by an author who helped define the genre 

First published in 1959, Shirley Jackson’s The Haunting of Hill House has been hailed as a perfect work of unnerving terror. It is the story of four seekers who arrive at a notoriously unfriendly pile called Hill House: Dr. Montague, an occult scholar looking for solid evidence of a “haunting”; Theodora, his lighthearted assistant; Eleanor, a friendless, fragile young woman well acquainted with poltergeists; and Luke, the future heir of Hill House. At first, their stay seems destined to be merely a spooky encounter with inexplicable phenomena. But Hill House is gathering its powers-and soon it will choose one of them to make its own.

My Thoughts

“Fear,” the doctor said, “is the relinquishment of logic, the willing relinquishing of reasonable patterns. We yield to it or we fight it, but we cannot meet it halfway.”

Touted as being one of the greatest horror authors, Shirley Jackson ultimately disappointed me with her novel The Haunting of Hill House, published first in 1959. Having been so disappointed with the horror genre as of late, I think I went into reading this book expecting too much. Continue reading